The Mary Rose Benefits from the British National Lottery

 
 

The Hull of the Mary Rose Undergoing Preservation

 
Arguably the most famous shipwreck is that of the RMS Titanic, which sank in the North Atlantic in 1912 after leaving for her maiden voyage from Southampton. However an equally interesting sinking took place around the coast at Portsmouth some 367 years before.

It is likely the Mary Rose was built around in 1510 in Portsmouth but the first documented reference to this great ship was in the 1520s when she was recorded as being in the River Thames. She was one of the capital ships of Henry VIIIs ‘Navy Royal,’ which became the Royal Navy of today.

The Mary Rose distinguished herself by fighting against French ships several times before being refitted in 1535. In July 1545, she sallied out of Portsmouth to face the French once again. It is unclear what happened but whilst King Henry was dining on another ship, the Henry Grace a Dieu, the Mary Rose heeled over and sank with the loss of hundreds of men.

There were several attempts to salvage the ship but to no avail. As the years passed by the wreck was covered by the soft silt found at the bottom of the Solent, which sealed the hull from erosion. Every now and again artifacts from the ship would be found on the seabed: tantalizing evidence that kept the legend of this great ship in mind.

In 1982, a team finally managed to raise the majority of the ships hull in the full glare of television cameras, following her rediscovery in 1966 and many years of excavation and planning. More than 10,000 artifacts were collected and preserved.

Now began the preservation of the timbers and the items recovered. From the very beginning, the Mary Rose Trust received some £9.5 million from the British National Lottery to get the work done and a makeshift museum was built to house the ship and the exhibits.

In recent years, progress has been made to build a proper Mary Rose museum in Portsmouth, just yards from that other great ship, HMS Victory. The project required £35 million for completion and the British National Lottery funded much of it with a £23 million grant.

The Mary Rose is the only 16th Century ship on display in the world. The new museum, to be opened on 31 May 2013, houses not only the hull but also the now 19,000 artifacts found with the wreck. Exhibits include items in a remarkable state of preservation, ranging from the skeleton of the ship’s dog to leather sandals and books.

With the help of the British National Lottery money, the preservation of the ship’s timbers is in its latter stages. Visitors can still only see the hull through a series of windows but it is hoped these will be removed in four or five years time so the ship can be seen in its entirety.

The Chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund, Dame Jenny Abramsky, said, “It’s incredibly exciting that, after much painstaking conservation work, the Mary Rose is finally ready to go back on show in a wonderful new space where she will undoubtedly wow all who come to visit.”

It is exciting that money from the British National Lottery is being put to such good use.

Find out more about this fascinating project on the Mary Rose website.
 
 

Wiltshire Great Grandfather Wins UK Lottery Draw

 
 

Older Man Throwing Money Into The Air

 
Many of us play the British National Lottery or the European prize draw hoping to win a prize but John Alford of Trowbridge in Wiltshire won three times on the same day.

The 76-year-old great grandfather usually buys his tickets at his local shop but last week he was in the local Asda store and decided to buy three tickets there. He was pleased to win £2 on a Scratchcard and took the other two tickets home.

John and his wife, Pauline, didn’t look at the tickets until last Sunday morning. When they finally checked the draw numbers they found they had won another £5 on Thunderball but were stunned to find they had also won £1.4 million in the Lotto draw of the UK lottery draw.

Like so many other winners, the couple’s first plan is a holiday to get used to their good fortune.

Find out more about the lucky winners on the ThisIsWiltshire.co.uk website.
 
 

Lottery Latest News: Beware Lottery Fraud

 
 

Lottery Fraud Message On Smartphone

 
For some time now we at UKLotteryDraw.com have been warning of the large number of scams purporting to be from lottery administrators announcing that the recipient has won a large prize. Scammers email, phone, text or mail to say that the money can be made available if the victim either provides their personal details or sends an amount of money as an ‘administration fee’ (or some other plausible reason).

The KDSK programme, 5 On Your Side, described such scams in the St. Louis, Missouri area on their website, KDSK.com. Scammers are to be found operating from a wide variety of countries, including Canada and Nigeria, but the threat to Americans seems to be largely from Jamaica, for some reason (read our article on the Jamaican fraudsters).

The sad truth is that many innocent people are losing their life savings to these people, who are netting millions of pounds or dollars every year. Police forces in the originating countries are moving in to crack down on this crime but the industry is still booming nonetheless.

The only real way to combat this dreadful crime is to educate potential victims so they do not respond to such approaches.

No matter where the source of the scammers email (or whatever media they use), the rules are always the same:

1. To be in a lottery, you must have first bought a ticket or joined a syndicate. No lottery will operate without participants buying tickets; if you have not paid for your entry, you are not going to win a prize.

2. Lottery administrators NEVER send you any sort of notification of your winning a prize. It is always up to you to claim your prize by approaching them.

3. Never, ever provide personal details or send money to anyone who approaches you unexpectedly. A scammers email or letter can look very official and texts and telephone calls can be very persuasive but do not respond.

Do not even click on links within the email as they can download viruses or other malware to your computer. Equally, do not press any button on your phone if prompted by a telephone caller or message: in such a situation you may well be passed through to a premium rate number, for which you will pay.

4. If any other evidence is needed, a scammers email or letter will use strange language that indicates that English is not the user’s first language. If anything rings alarm bells, go with your gut feeling and back away.

5. The best response is to do nothing at all. Delete the fraudsters email, destroy the letter, put down the telephone, or delete the text. You cannot be caught out if you refuse to play along. Your local police force might be interested however so you might consider taking the letter, copy of the email, the text or details of the telephone call to them.

The old adage ‘if it seems to good to be true, it probably is not true’ is very appropriate.

Please do not encourage these criminals.

To find out more about UK lottery draw scams, visit the National Lottery website. The ActionFraud website is also useful.
 
 

Latest Lottery News: Unexpected Lottery Winners

 
 

Looking Into The Sun At The Shot At Dawn Memorial in Staffordshire

 
The latest lottery news this week has produced two stories that show that lotteries can produce winners in ways you might not expect.

As reported on the Independent.ie website today, the administrators of the Irish National Lottery found themselves paying out more prizes than expected this week.

Saturday’s lottery draw included the number 9. However the ball concerned was incorrectly labelled and one digit did not have a line under the 9. This means when the numbers were recapped at the end of the draw the number was read out as a 6.

Fortunately the National Lottery administrators have held up their hands to the mistake and are paying out to anyone who had won a prize with 6 in their numbers. This means they may have to fork out an extra €54,000.

Read the whole story on the Independent.ie website.

At the same time, news has reached us of an unusual group of volunteers helping restore a war memorial.

Thirty-five lottery winners got together and helped build a path at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire. They spent two days on the project, at the ‘Shot at Dawn’ memorial, digging the path before raking on the surface.

Peter Brusby, who won £1.4 million from the National Lottery in 2005, explained that the volunteers had the spare time now so they had decided to give something back.

Thinking of the memorial, he told a Press Association reporter, “It’s a marvellous place and it just brings back what sacrifices have been made, and I think we should put something into that.”

It is good news to hear that lottery winners are being so thoughtful following their own good fortune.
 
 

Exploring the Four Types of Lottery Games in the U.S

 
 

A Hand Holding Four Megamillions Lottery Tickets

 
Most of those who wish for a financial miracle, are looking towards state administered lotteries with confidence and hope that one day they will get lucky. In the absence of a national lottery, there are 43 distinct lotteries managed by various states and also a handful of multiple state lotteries. This means that there are plenty of opportunities for those who feel lucky, especially with no limitations being in place for people who reside in a different state than the one in which they intend to play the lottery.
 
The three types of number games
 
There are over 200 lottery games played throughout the United States, but they can be grouped in four categories and three of them are number games. One number games imply the fact that the player selects one number that has three, four and recently five digits, and then choose whether he intends to play this as a straight or a box. For the straight to be a winner the exact number needs to come, while the box will reward the player even if the digits come in a different order.
 
Multi-number games can be with one or two sets of numbers ranging from 1 to a certain value that is predefined, and the payouts depend on how many numbers are correctly predicted. The order in which the chosen numbers come doesn’t matter but it is difficult enough to predict all six numbers and that’s why the prizes are so generous. Among those with two sets of numbers, games such as Powerball or Mega Millions are very popular due to the huge rewards. The odds for someone to win in either of these games are dismal, but this doesn’t prevent fun seeking individuals from playing week after week. More over there are four types of games ran by state administered lotteries in the United States to learn more about them visit Lotterycrunch.com and participate in amazing lotteries from all around the world.
 
Keno type and other lottery games
 
Keno games are very popular throughout the United States and their resemblance with multi-number games is uncanny. The difference resides in the fact that the player chooses 10 numbers that range between 1 and 82 and twice as more numbers than the player selects are being drawn. This means that in a regular Keno game 20 numbers are drawn and once again the payouts vary depending on how many numbers one can predict.
 
Some states have their own games that resemble a more or less conventional lottery game, and the Kicker is one of those who don’t stray too far from traditional lotteries. In this case the difference is that the players are purchasing cards that have prearranged numbers, otherwise the rules stay the same. Last but not least there are states like California that run horse racing games such as the Daily Derby.
 
 

UK Lottery Draw Money Helps Preserve Our Maritime Heritage

 
 

SS Shieldhall Tied Up In Port And Welcoming Visitors

 
In these times of financial restraint, charities and good causes find it harder to get money to continue their good work. At the same time more people than ever are playing the British National Lottery and Euromillions prize draw in the hope that they will win a prize that would remove their monetary worries.

Fortunately around 28% of the money received by the two lotteries is used to fund worthwhile projects around the United Kingdom. This means the players of the British National Lottery and Euromillions prize draw are helping cash-strapped charities.

A group of enthusiasts in Southampton have just received one such award. For a number of years, the steamship SS Shieldhall has been carefully tended by a group of enthusiasts but modern standards have meant an extra burden on their finances and the real possibility that the ship might have ended up in the scrapyard.

In June 2012, the Heritage Lottery Fund provided £143,600 as a contribution towards a full inspection in a dry dock in Falmouth to identify any problems with the Shieldhall. This was given following a busy period for the volunteers of Solent Steam Packet Limited, the company responsible for the ship, which participated in the celebrations surrounding the Cunard Jubilee celebrations and in the Titanic anniversary commemorations.

Hard work by volunteers was rewarded again on 2 April 2013 when the Heritage Lottery Fund announced it’s support of a 3-year project, ‘Saving Shieldhall – Learning Through Conservation in Action.’ The funding for the scheme now totals £1.4 million and enables a programme of major repairs and modifications.

Once the money from the British National Lottery has enabled the completion of the work, SS Shieldhall will be the focus of a wide range of community activities. Not only will the ship be used for passenger trips but she will also provide opportunities for apprentices and other young people to learn about maintaining and running shipping.

Southampton’s Nuffield Theatre is even ready to work on arts projects connected to the vessel.

Although built to a classic 1930’s design, Shieldhall was first launched on the Clyde in 1955. Her first role was as a sewage vessel, carrying treated sludge out to sea, and running pleasure cruises during the summer months. After ownership by Glasgow Corporation, Southern Water bought the ship before she was retired in 1985. The preservation charity then purchased her in 1988. She is a prime example of ship engineering common during the end of the nineteenth century and early twentieth century.

The British National Lottery money will enable many more people to learn about their maritime and engineering heritage. Perhaps SS Shieldhall will also fire the enthusiasm of a new generation for a career on the water.

Find out more about SS Shieldhall on the dedicated website.