The Euromillions Prize Draw Changes the Lives of A Scunthorpe Couple

 
 
On the 26 July this year the Euromillions prize draw did not produce a jackpot winner but that does not mean there were no winners at all. Of course there were people who took away between £250,000 and £2.70 in smaller prizes but there were also 100 players who received £1 million in the Euromillions prize draw Millionaires Raffle.

Every week of course someone takes away £1 million as a result of this draw in addition to any other prize they have won in the Euromillions prize draw.
 

Three Exploding Rockets in a Firework Display

 
One of the 100 lucky people on 26 July was Dave Long of Scunthorpe. The 58 year old discovered the winning ticket in the waste bin and, despite the inevitable excitement such a win creates, he and his fiancée, Kath Mackenzie, did not touch the money for a few weeks. Wisely they immediately placed the sum in the bank where it accrued interest.

This does not mean they will not use their new wealth however. Following the advice of lottery experts, the couple took a holiday on the Norfolk Broads to plan their future.

Top of the list for the pair, who have been together for 12 years, is a wedding next year. Dave has also decided to leave his lorry driving of 21 years to take early retirement. Although he enjoyed the job he felt the time had come to enjoy what he feels is important in life.

The couple’s plans also include a season ticket for Liverpool football club, a cruise, a new car and a camper van.

We hope their Euromillions prize draw win will be the start of a new and exciting phase of life together.

Read more about this lucky couple on the This Is Scunthorpe website.
 

BannerFans.com
 

The British National Lottery Anniversary Run

 
 

View of Inside of London Olympic Stadium

 
It hardly seems possible but it is nearly one year since the London Olympics, supported by the British National Lottery, took place. To mark the anniversary, there will be a series of athletic events at the end of July this year.

On 21 July however the first of the events after the Olympics will be a 5-mile anniversary run to celebrate the continued involvement of the British National Lottery in British sport.

The National Lottery Anniversary Run route explores the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park before ending in the Olympic Stadium itself. This enables ordinary ‘hobby’ runners to experience crossing the finish line in what is now a famous sporting venue. Each runner has the opportunity to bring two members of their family or friends to cheer them across the line.

Children have an opportunity to take part too with a shorter family friendly course available.

The winner of six gold medals, Sir Chris Hoy will start the run on the 21st July and has already said he will be available to encourage the 10 000 runners around the course. He said, “I know how crucial the National Lottery’s support was throughout my career and I am looking forward to being able to play my part in what promises to be a memorable day.”

There will be a number of sports stars and celebrities running too to mark the support of sporting projects by the British National Lottery. The lottery has so far invested a total of £4 billion in this area, £2.2 billion towards the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games alone.

But the Anniversary Run also commemorates the ongoing involvement of the British National Lottery in funding more than 1300 athletes as they prepare for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

The 2013 Anniversary Run clearly demonstrates that the London 2012 Olympics were not the end of sports funding from the British National Lottery.

Discover more about the 2013 National Lottery Anniversary Run on the dedicated website.
 

 
 

Euromillions Prize Draw Surprises Norwegian Player

 
 

Norwegian Church Amongst Snowy Trees

 

Winning a lottery jackpot can change lives and so it was with a winner of the Euromillions prize draw on 3 May this year.

Norwegian businessman Yngvar Borgersen had forgotten he had even bought a ticket for the lottery. He and his son watched the lottery draw on television at home when they heard the Euromillions prize draw jackpot had been won by a person in Skien, their hometown. The sum, 102 million Kroner (£11 million or $17 million), was a new record for a Norwegian winner.

63-year-old Yngvar and his wife went to Turkey on a business trip. Sitting in their room in the Orient House hotel, Istanbul, he found he had a missed call from the Norwegian lottery administrators, Norsk Tipping. His wife persuaded Yngvar to call the company as “it could involve a very large sum.”

Finally on Saturday morning they received confirmation of their good luck. Yngvar celebrated the win with a bottle of champagne with his work associates. He returned to work on the Monday.

The family business, Water and Engergiteknikk, works in the drilling industry and Yngvar initially told reporters he was unlikely to buy any of the usual trappings of a lottery winner but was more likely to purchase a drilling rig for the company.

Subsequently, however, the businessman has used £280,000 of his winnings to help his local football team, Odd Grenland, keep hold of their top defender, Fredrik Semb Berge. Interestingly, Yngvar shows how good he is with money as the agreement means he will receive 25% of any future transfer fee the club receives for Berge.

The story of Yngvar Borgersen shows how winners of the Euromillions prize draw can keep a cool head and help the community too.
 
 

The UK Lottery Draw Helps Make Us Healthy

 
 

Mother and Son Trying Yoga at Organized Outside Event

 
The money from the British National Lottery and the Euromillions prize draw has been shared with some pretty good causes over the 20 or so years they have been running in their present guise.

One of the biggest recipients of this money is the field of health. In March this year the Big Lottery fund announced a further donation of £40 million to a health-related project. This means that over the last five years no less than £1 billion has passed to health and well-being projects from the coffers of the UK lottery draw.

The latest funding is in response to research undertaken by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), published in the Lancet, which shows Britain lagging behind other European countries with regards to sickness, health and life expectancy.

Overall the study did find that health has improved since 1990, but other countries have performed significantly better. Mortality rates have actually worsened specifically for men aged between 30-34 years old and for all men and women between 20 – 54 years old. Over all groups, the cases of heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, breast cancer, cirrhosis and drug use disorders (among others) have increased. Tobacco, substance abuse and a high body-mass index were noted problems. It was felt diet and inactivity were also major contributors to the number of people disabled by illness.

The money from the UK lottery draw supports initiatives that combat these problems. The ‘Well-being’ fund looks to improve physical activity, improve our diet and tackle mental health issues.

The National Lottery Good Causes body also undertook their own study through YouGov Plc. They found that 45% of people in the United Kingdom felt they did not have the time to worry about their health. 38% also felt money prevented them from improving their lives.

The Chair of the Big Lottery fund in England, Nat Stone, said: “Our £40 million comes at a crucial time as recent research highlights cost is a barrier for many people when it comes to their health and well-being. It will build on a range of free initiatives that we have funded in the last five years which target people in deprived communities and have been proven to work well. It will directly help hundreds of thousands to lead a healthier lifestyle and become more active.”

It is good to know that money from the British National Lottery and Euromillions prize draw is being put to such a healthy use.
 
 

Latest Lottery News About the Irish Lottery

 
 

Young Woman Holding a Fan of Euro Banknotes

 
Each global international lottery seems to have made an appearance in the latest lottery news but the Irish National Lottery has had more coverage than most.

The Irish Times reported this week that some €14.7 million ($19 million or £12.4 million) remained unclaimed last year. Under Irish law, winners have only three months to collect their winnings: after that time the money returns to the present lottery administrator, An Post, for marketing purposes.

Over the last 5 years unclaimed prizes have totalled an amazing €90 million: 2% of total ticket sales. Amazingly the largest unclaimed prize was for €3.4 million drawn in June 2001.

Last month the Irish parliament, the Dáil, passed a bill to put the 20-year licence for the National Lottery up for sale.

Any new private sector administrator will pay a sum upfront for the licence and will be expected to return a significant income to the government to be distributed to good causes (as in many other countries). Indeed, the new licence will also change the use of any unclaimed prizes, returning the money for use in good causes rather than for marketing programmes.

Until now ticket sales until now have been restricted but the new measures mean this will no longer be the case, raising more income than before.

The Irish National Lottery started in March 1987 to support initiatives in areas of sport, heritage and culture. From that day the draw administrators have been a government-run body overseeing the running of the state Lotto and the Irish section of the Euromillions prize draw.

At the end of last year the Irish National Lottery had achieved sales of over €12 billion with €6.7 billion paid out as prizes and €4.2 billion given to various good causes.
 
 

Latest Lottery News: Lottery Prizes Go Unclaimed

 
 

Bags Full of Gold Pound Coins

 
We imagine that everyone who buys a ticket in the British National Lottery or the European prize draw (or any other lottery for that matter) would keep it safe and carefully check it against the winning numbers in the draw but it seems that is not necessarily the case.

Two reports have emerged this week of lottery winners who do not appear to have realised there is money waiting for them.

The Belfast Telegraph reports a prize of £92,991 from the British National Lottery has yet to be claimed. The ticket was bought in Newtownabbey on 17 April but nobody has come forward.

If this situation continues until October this year, the money will be passed to one of the many good causes supported by the lottery.

At the same time, the This Is South Wales website revealed that a Millionaire Raffle ticket from the 16 April European prize draw has not been claimed.

The £1 million prize would change a life considerably. It is possible the winner checked the main draw numbers but forgot they could be eligible for a prize through the related Millionaire Raffle.

Again, the prize has to be claimed by October or it will be lost and passed to charity.

If you live in these areas and still have your old tickets, please check them again: otherwise search the house to see if you have mislaid a ticket. It might be well worth your while!
 
 

Hard Economic Times Mean Fraud Is On The Increase

 
 

Young Man Sat At A Table With His Head In His Hands

 
We all dream of winning money on the British National Lottery or on the Euromillions prize draw and some unscrupulous operators play on this by sending out emails, texts, and letters or calling us on the telephone telling us we have won money. Unfortunately all they want is our personal details or for us to send them money.

A recent report from the British Citizens Advice Bureau shows that the harder economic times are persuading more and more people to send out scam correspondence in the hope of getting some easy money. Sadly, their schemes work all too often, causing embarrassment, financial hardship and stress to their victims.

A study from the Office of Fair Trading quoted in the CAB report tell us that lottery scams cost the British public £260 million each year with around 140,000 victims suffering. Separate data shows a further £60 million is raised from another 380,000 victims over other scams defined as prize draw or sweepstake fraud.

We have to be vigilant to ensure these scammers do not manage to get the better of us. The reality is if it seems too good to be true then it probably is – walk away.

Remember a scammer’s email will always look very inviting.

The frauds will not only offer you a supposed British National Lottery or European prize draw jackpot, they take many forms. Read the CAB report to find out more and how to stay away from these scams.
 
 

Lottery Latest News: Beware Lottery Fraud

 
 

Lottery Fraud Message On Smartphone

 
For some time now we at UKLotteryDraw.com have been warning of the large number of scams purporting to be from lottery administrators announcing that the recipient has won a large prize. Scammers email, phone, text or mail to say that the money can be made available if the victim either provides their personal details or sends an amount of money as an ‘administration fee’ (or some other plausible reason).

The KDSK programme, 5 On Your Side, described such scams in the St. Louis, Missouri area on their website, KDSK.com. Scammers are to be found operating from a wide variety of countries, including Canada and Nigeria, but the threat to Americans seems to be largely from Jamaica, for some reason (read our article on the Jamaican fraudsters).

The sad truth is that many innocent people are losing their life savings to these people, who are netting millions of pounds or dollars every year. Police forces in the originating countries are moving in to crack down on this crime but the industry is still booming nonetheless.

The only real way to combat this dreadful crime is to educate potential victims so they do not respond to such approaches.

No matter where the source of the scammers email (or whatever media they use), the rules are always the same:

1. To be in a lottery, you must have first bought a ticket or joined a syndicate. No lottery will operate without participants buying tickets; if you have not paid for your entry, you are not going to win a prize.

2. Lottery administrators NEVER send you any sort of notification of your winning a prize. It is always up to you to claim your prize by approaching them.

3. Never, ever provide personal details or send money to anyone who approaches you unexpectedly. A scammers email or letter can look very official and texts and telephone calls can be very persuasive but do not respond.

Do not even click on links within the email as they can download viruses or other malware to your computer. Equally, do not press any button on your phone if prompted by a telephone caller or message: in such a situation you may well be passed through to a premium rate number, for which you will pay.

4. If any other evidence is needed, a scammers email or letter will use strange language that indicates that English is not the user’s first language. If anything rings alarm bells, go with your gut feeling and back away.

5. The best response is to do nothing at all. Delete the fraudsters email, destroy the letter, put down the telephone, or delete the text. You cannot be caught out if you refuse to play along. Your local police force might be interested however so you might consider taking the letter, copy of the email, the text or details of the telephone call to them.

The old adage ‘if it seems to good to be true, it probably is not true’ is very appropriate.

Please do not encourage these criminals.

To find out more about UK lottery draw scams, visit the National Lottery website. The ActionFraud website is also useful.
 
 

Online Lottery – Gaming Tradition with a Modern Edge

 
 

Jackpot Image On Purple Laptop

 
People have been playing lotteries for a very long time. In fact, lotteries began on an official basis as far back as 205 BCE! In Europe, the first ever national lotteries were drawn by the kings and queens themselves as somewhat of a royal event. Since then it has become a staple in every country and is easily the most popular form of gaming across the population as a whole. It goes without saying, then, that the online lottery was only a matter of time, and it too has become a smash hit amongst gamers and lotto fanatics alike.
 
The online lottery is, as the name implies, an online version of the traditional lottery that originally made the game famous. This means that players are able to purchase their lottery tickets online and even partake in a series of other related things as part of the fun. This can include catching up on the latest lottery results (both online and offline events), reading stories from the latest big winners, comparing all the latest odds on the most popular lotteries both locally and nationally, being able to purchase discounted lottery tickets and even take part in free lottery events for online players only.
 
One of the most popular forms of online lottery is 49’s Lotto, otherwise known as just “49’s”. 49’s Lotto is a British lottery that is all about the draws. There are two lottery draws taking place each day, every day of the week. A total of six main numbers are drawn with a bonus number known as the ‘booster’, from a pool of 49 balls (hence the name 49’s Lottery). Players can win a whopping £601 for just 3 matching numbers on a £1 ticket!
 
Most online betting sites have a lottery-dedicated page, and it is here that you can ensure your ticket in the next big draw. William Hill Sports is a good place to go if you’re new to the craze, as they have all the big events covered and an easy-to-navigate site. Just click on the event that fancies you and let the fun begin! You can visit us at sports.williamhill.com/bet/en-gb/lotto/49S/49-s-6-ball.html
 
 

Euromillions Prize Draw Winner ‘Not Bothered’

 
 

Bottle Of Champagne In The Snow

 

We all scan the Euromillions results hoping that we have purchased a winning ticket. I suspect that we would be somewhat excited if we found we had actually won a major prize in the Euromillions prize draw.

45-year-old George Traykov of Ilford in Essex however claims to be not that bothered about his latest win.

Mr. Traykov, a property developer originally from Bulgaria, won £160,873 in the Euromillions prize draw earlier this year. It took him two months to claim his prize however and it brings his total winnings up to £1.2 million after also winning in September 2011.

He sounded a little disappointed that he had not won the top prize of £12 million and told the press that winning in the lottery did not compare with the thrill of skydiving, his first love.

A former member of the Bulgarian national skydiving team, Mr. Traykov said, “nothing compares to skydiving.” With his first win he sent his daughter, Elaine, to private school and booked her skydiving lessons.

The single father has no plans to move away from Ilford. He has lived in the town for almost 20 years, says he has “lovely neighbours” and he feels safe in the area. He plans to renovate his home with the money he has won.

He is teetotal and had to practise spraying champagne for photographers. Earlier this year he did have holiday in Cancun to get used to his new situation but feels he has always had enough money in his life. “I’ve always worked hard and never spent more than I have so money has never been a major problem for me,” he said.

Mr. Traykov could still win more money; he has three more tickets he has not yet checked and, in any case, still intends to play the Euromillions prize draw.