UK Lottery Draw Supports the Heritage Motor Centre

 
 
The UK lottery draw raises money for a number of good causes around the country, some small and some much larger. One of the most spectacular of course was the 2012 London Olympics but another very obvious recipient is to be found just south of the M40 motorway at Gaydon, Warwickshire.

Set in 65 acres of well-tended parkland next to the elegant Aston Martin headquarters and the Jaguar/Land Rover Design and Engineering Centre, the Heritage Motor Centre houses a professional conference centre as well as nearly 300 exhibits tracing the development of the British car industry over more than 100 years.
 

Display of Race and Rally Cars at the Heritage Motor Centre Supported by UK Lottery Draw

 

The centre opened in 1993, combining the collections previously held at Studley, Warwickshire and Syon Park, London, much of it the property of the British Motor Industry Heritage Trust. This trust was created in 1986, supported by British Leyland (later Rover), inheriting in it’s turn vehicles and archives held by Leyland Historic Vehicles (set up in 1975) and BL Heritage Ltd. (1979).

The new centre is owned by a charitable trust and was built in a stunning Art Deco style, which provides a dramatic view to visitors as they arrive.

In 2006 the centre was redeveloped with the help of a £1.3 million grant from the UK lottery draw. After five months, the new centre was opened by the Princess Royal.

But don’t get the idea the UK lottery draw was supporting a static and musty museum. There is always something going on at the Heritage Motor Centre. There are regular meetings of enthusiasts in the large car parks outside the centre and those who arrive in a classic car pay a reduced entry fee; the day after I visited owners of Morris Minor Travellers were meeting at the site. At other times there are classic vehicle shows and rallies as well as shows covering other areas such as toys, model railways and even model aircraft.

The centre hosts specific exhibitions too: at present there is a display celebrating 100 years of Aston Martin cars.

As you arrive at the site you realize there is a lot going on: behind the Heritage Motor Centre is the banked Jaguar/Land Rover test track and you can hear powerful cars going through their paces. There is an extensive restoration and maintenance workshop in the building where five technicians look after the exhibits and prepare them for the many exhibitions and rallies they attend as well as for the Centre’s own displays.

For an extra fee, visitors can also book a demonstration ride in a Land Rover or pilot a four-wheel drive vehicle around the off-road course on site. Twice a day there is a guided tour of the centre and a restaurant, extensive conference facilities and even a wedding venue are available for use.

In 2008, the centre’s archive store was updated too. This area contains some 1 million documents, photographs and films related to the British car industry over the last 100 years. In 2005, the UK lottery draw provided money for the purchase of the Nick Baldwin collection of important archive material.

But it doesn’t even stop there: the Heritage Motor Centre owns some 300 significant vehicles with only around 180 on display at any one time. There are plans in place for an extra building to house the cars not normally on display as well as a new workshop facility and the UK lottery draw has already provided money for the planning stage. Hopefully the UK lottery draw will be closely involved in all stages of the development.

The UK lottery draw gets involved in many fascinating and deserving projects and the Heritage Motor Centre is certainly one to make players of the UK lottery draw proud. Why not pay the centre a visit, talk to the friendly staff and volunteers and know you are supporting one of the most interesting and significant museums?

If you want to find out more about the Heritage Motor Centre, visit their website.
 

 

Get More From Your National Lottery Draw Numbers

 
 
A little while ago Camelot, the administrators of the British National Lottery announced there would be changes made to the main Lotto draw, resulting in more money being available when you match National Lottery draw numbers. The time has come for those changes to be implemented.

As of Saturday 5 October 2013 the tickets will increase in price from £1 to £2 (in line with the Euromillions draw) and the minimum jackpots will increase from £3.9 million to £5 million on a Saturday and from £2.1 million to £2.5 million on a Wednesday.
 

Young Lady Holding Twenty Pound Notes

 

The smaller prizes for matching National Lottery draw numbers will change in value too. The larger prizes will actually reduce in value, matching 5 National Lottery draw numbers plus a Bonus Ball used to net the player £100,000 but this will now become £50,000. Equally just 5 numbers matched brings £1000 instead of the previous £1500.

Match 4 National Lottery draw numbers however and the reward increases from £60 to £100: similarly, matching 3 numbers now brings £25, instead of £10.

Bear in mind the prizes can increase according to the amount of ticket sales and the number of winners.

The biggest change however is that Camelot are bringing in a raffle system, similar to that already existing in the UK Euromillions draw. The prize fund available is also £1 million (as in the European lottery) but, for the Lotto draw, this is divided between 50 players, each receiving £20,000 in addition to anything they might win by selecting the right National Lottery draw numbers.

There is an interesting twist to the new raffle scheme, however, as the number of raffle winners will increase as the jackpot rolls over. Every time the top prize rolls over, another 50 x £20,000 raffle prizes are added to the Lotto draw. This means a quadruple rollover will result in 250 raffle winners!

To launch the new look National lottery there will be two special draws on Saturday 5th October and Saturday 12th October 2013. On both these nights the jackpot will be guaranteed to be at least £10 million and there will be a massive 1,000 winners of the £20,000 raffle prize.

The new tickets will go on sale on 3 October 2013. Don’t forget that, although you will be paying more, the National Lottery draw numbers you select will give you the potential to win more than before.

 

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Agricultural Support Body Helped by the English Lottery

 
 
Money from the English lottery has helped a wide range of good causes since it’s inception in 1994. Cultural, heritage, health, sport and other charities have benefited to the tune of £30 billion over the years.

One very worthy cause recently received a much-needed donation from the English lottery. Hill farming is one of the most lonely and stressful occupations available.

Farmers work round the clock every day of the week to keep their business going, having to turn their hand to a wide range of skills, before being paid a minimal amount to cover their annual costs. According to Government statistics, farmers are twice as likely to commit suicide as the rest of the population.

The problems can be particularly pronounced in wilder areas and the English lottery was able to give £450,119 to a support group for farmers in one such region. Upper Teesdale Agricultural Support Services Ltd. is a company and charity owned by local people employing eight staff and a large group of volunteers dedicated to supporting farmers and communities in the Teesdale area of County Durham.
 

Teesdale Sheep on a Hill Overlooking Teesdale

 

UTASS is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to give support and advice to those who need it. They are there to assist with understanding and completing complex forms, distributing information connected with difficult agricultural legislation, liaising with appropriate bodies to help relieve hardship, coordinate training courses, running evenings for local teenagers, organizing community events and just offering help and advice when needed, among many other services.

But the English lottery is not the only organization that has realized the importance of a group such as this: the Prince of Wales’ own Countryside Fund has provided help. Prince Charles visited the UTASS in October 2012 and featured the organization when he was invited to guest edit the BBC’s Countryfile programme in March this year.

The English lottery money did not come too soon for the UTASS as their members have had to deal with severe weather over the last year. The organization has had to recruit ‘helping hands’ volunteers to assist farmers with day-to-day tasks made overwhelming by the difficult conditions. At the same time, negotiations have lead to Barclays Bank offering a financial package to help farmers cope with the money problems severe weather can bring.

Once again money from the English lottery has been shown to make a difference. Keep buying your English lottery tickets and 28 pence from every pound will go to deserving good causes like Upper Teesdale Agricultural Support Services Ltd.

Find out more about the UTASS on their website.
 
 

Sailing Couple Win UK Lottery Draw

 
 

Sailing Boat by a Suffolk Warehouse

 
Usually winning then jackpot in a lottery leads to new holidays but, for a retired couple from Ipswich in Suffolk, hitting the jackpot in the UK lottery draw meant the end of a holiday.

Richard and Cathy Brown were looking forward to a ten-week sailing trip around Britain in their 40-foot yacht ‘Brave.’ They had reached as far as Newcastle when Richard decided to check the UK lottery draw results on his new smart phone.

The couple had been playing the UK lottery draw since it’s launch in 1994, buying a month’s worth of tickets at a time. Richard told reporters, “As we were settling down for the evening in Newcastle I decided to use the app I’d just downloaded as a bit of an experiment.”

As Cathy watched, Richard started to match the numbers showing on the screen. They got more and more excited as the realisation dawned they had won. Richard turned to Cathy and said, “You’re a multimillionaire!”

After a stiff gin and tonic the couple rang Camelot, the administrators of the UK lottery draw, and confirmed they were the winners of the £6,123,395 top prize. A few days later Richard and Cathy made the customary visit to a Camelot advisor to receive the money and plan their future.

All the plans the couple had before their win have simply become more affordable. Their yacht will not change but their adventures will. There will be more trips on the boat but also charter trips abroad and a visit to Cathy’s sister in Canada.

Cathy said, “It’s been magical to think about our hopes and dreams for the future, knowing that when we get back we can make a difference to our live but also those nearest and dearest to us.”

Already content with their busy lives, Richard and Cathy are quite happy to consider a new house and car but will not let their UK lottery draw win change them. They are determined to stay in Ipswich and commented, “We have great friends and we already had a great life before the win, this is simply the very nice, top-of-the-range, icing on the cake.”

We wish the best of luck to this contented couple.
 
 

The British National Lottery Anniversary Run

 
 

View of Inside of London Olympic Stadium

 
It hardly seems possible but it is nearly one year since the London Olympics, supported by the British National Lottery, took place. To mark the anniversary, there will be a series of athletic events at the end of July this year.

On 21 July however the first of the events after the Olympics will be a 5-mile anniversary run to celebrate the continued involvement of the British National Lottery in British sport.

The National Lottery Anniversary Run route explores the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park before ending in the Olympic Stadium itself. This enables ordinary ‘hobby’ runners to experience crossing the finish line in what is now a famous sporting venue. Each runner has the opportunity to bring two members of their family or friends to cheer them across the line.

Children have an opportunity to take part too with a shorter family friendly course available.

The winner of six gold medals, Sir Chris Hoy will start the run on the 21st July and has already said he will be available to encourage the 10 000 runners around the course. He said, “I know how crucial the National Lottery’s support was throughout my career and I am looking forward to being able to play my part in what promises to be a memorable day.”

There will be a number of sports stars and celebrities running too to mark the support of sporting projects by the British National Lottery. The lottery has so far invested a total of £4 billion in this area, £2.2 billion towards the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games alone.

But the Anniversary Run also commemorates the ongoing involvement of the British National Lottery in funding more than 1300 athletes as they prepare for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

The 2013 Anniversary Run clearly demonstrates that the London 2012 Olympics were not the end of sports funding from the British National Lottery.

Discover more about the 2013 National Lottery Anniversary Run on the dedicated website.
 

 
 

The UK Lottery Draw Helps Make Us Healthy

 
 

Mother and Son Trying Yoga at Organized Outside Event

 
The money from the British National Lottery and the Euromillions prize draw has been shared with some pretty good causes over the 20 or so years they have been running in their present guise.

One of the biggest recipients of this money is the field of health. In March this year the Big Lottery fund announced a further donation of £40 million to a health-related project. This means that over the last five years no less than £1 billion has passed to health and well-being projects from the coffers of the UK lottery draw.

The latest funding is in response to research undertaken by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), published in the Lancet, which shows Britain lagging behind other European countries with regards to sickness, health and life expectancy.

Overall the study did find that health has improved since 1990, but other countries have performed significantly better. Mortality rates have actually worsened specifically for men aged between 30-34 years old and for all men and women between 20 – 54 years old. Over all groups, the cases of heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, breast cancer, cirrhosis and drug use disorders (among others) have increased. Tobacco, substance abuse and a high body-mass index were noted problems. It was felt diet and inactivity were also major contributors to the number of people disabled by illness.

The money from the UK lottery draw supports initiatives that combat these problems. The ‘Well-being’ fund looks to improve physical activity, improve our diet and tackle mental health issues.

The National Lottery Good Causes body also undertook their own study through YouGov Plc. They found that 45% of people in the United Kingdom felt they did not have the time to worry about their health. 38% also felt money prevented them from improving their lives.

The Chair of the Big Lottery fund in England, Nat Stone, said: “Our £40 million comes at a crucial time as recent research highlights cost is a barrier for many people when it comes to their health and well-being. It will build on a range of free initiatives that we have funded in the last five years which target people in deprived communities and have been proven to work well. It will directly help hundreds of thousands to lead a healthier lifestyle and become more active.”

It is good to know that money from the British National Lottery and Euromillions prize draw is being put to such a healthy use.
 
 

Latest Lottery News About the Irish Lottery

 
 

Young Woman Holding a Fan of Euro Banknotes

 
Each global international lottery seems to have made an appearance in the latest lottery news but the Irish National Lottery has had more coverage than most.

The Irish Times reported this week that some €14.7 million ($19 million or £12.4 million) remained unclaimed last year. Under Irish law, winners have only three months to collect their winnings: after that time the money returns to the present lottery administrator, An Post, for marketing purposes.

Over the last 5 years unclaimed prizes have totalled an amazing €90 million: 2% of total ticket sales. Amazingly the largest unclaimed prize was for €3.4 million drawn in June 2001.

Last month the Irish parliament, the Dáil, passed a bill to put the 20-year licence for the National Lottery up for sale.

Any new private sector administrator will pay a sum upfront for the licence and will be expected to return a significant income to the government to be distributed to good causes (as in many other countries). Indeed, the new licence will also change the use of any unclaimed prizes, returning the money for use in good causes rather than for marketing programmes.

Until now ticket sales until now have been restricted but the new measures mean this will no longer be the case, raising more income than before.

The Irish National Lottery started in March 1987 to support initiatives in areas of sport, heritage and culture. From that day the draw administrators have been a government-run body overseeing the running of the state Lotto and the Irish section of the Euromillions prize draw.

At the end of last year the Irish National Lottery had achieved sales of over €12 billion with €6.7 billion paid out as prizes and €4.2 billion given to various good causes.
 
 

Lottery Latest News: Lucky Areas of Britain

 
 

Magnifying Glass Lying on Ten Pound Notes

 
Latest statistics from Camelot, the administrator for the British National Lottery and the European prize draw, show the luckiest places to live in the UK. Following stories published here on UKLotteryDraw.com, we can hardly be surprised to see which area comes top.

Ilford in Essex, the scene of George Traykovs two wins recently, is the luckiest place in the country. Interestingly, this was also the case in 2011 so the regions luck seems to be consistent. If you live in the area statistics show you have a 1 in 6722 chance of winning a lottery prize.

Second on the list is Newcastle with a 1 in 6884 chance and third are the Medway towns in Kent with a 1 in 6972 chance. The Medway towns have produced 35 lottery millionaires since the British National Lottery started.

Despite the statistics, this does not mean you should move to Ilford to get rich. In theory every ticket bought, wherever you are, has the same chance of winning.
 
 

The British National Lottery Rewards Two Friends

 
 

Older Couple Celebrating With a Glass of Champagne

 
Two close friends of 38 years have reason to celebrate playing the British National Lottery. Joe McKay and Henry Milne, aged 63 and 60 years respectively, live in Greenock, Scotland and first met in 1975. They began to play darts together and, a few years ago, decided to also play the British National Lottery.

The two played the lottery for years before, on 16 March this year, they finally received their reward.

That particular week it was Henry’s turn to buy the tickets but left it to his wife, Margaret. She paid for five Lucky Dip lines in the Saturday draw but it was not until the following Tuesday that Henry remembered to check the tickets.

He went into shock when he saw they had matched all six numbers. Joe’s telephone was engaged and Henry was in no state to drive so his two daughters drove him to his friend’s house to share the good news. Joe did not believe they had won and it took both Henry’s daughters to persuade him.

Henry told reporters: “It’s just such an amazing thing to have happen to us, especially as we are nearing retirement age. We’re just two regular guys who like a pint in the pub.”

Joe worked in the building trade but had recently been laid off due to a lack of work so the win could hardly have come at a better time for him. His first purchase will be a new car, as his present one needs replacing. Henry is happy working in his job as a heavy goods driver but would not discount taking a holiday with his wife.

Once again the British National Lottery improves the lives of deserving winners. We wish them the very best of luck.
 
 

The Mary Rose Benefits from the British National Lottery

 
 

The Hull of the Mary Rose Undergoing Preservation

 
Arguably the most famous shipwreck is that of the RMS Titanic, which sank in the North Atlantic in 1912 after leaving for her maiden voyage from Southampton. However an equally interesting sinking took place around the coast at Portsmouth some 367 years before.

It is likely the Mary Rose was built around in 1510 in Portsmouth but the first documented reference to this great ship was in the 1520s when she was recorded as being in the River Thames. She was one of the capital ships of Henry VIIIs ‘Navy Royal,’ which became the Royal Navy of today.

The Mary Rose distinguished herself by fighting against French ships several times before being refitted in 1535. In July 1545, she sallied out of Portsmouth to face the French once again. It is unclear what happened but whilst King Henry was dining on another ship, the Henry Grace a Dieu, the Mary Rose heeled over and sank with the loss of hundreds of men.

There were several attempts to salvage the ship but to no avail. As the years passed by the wreck was covered by the soft silt found at the bottom of the Solent, which sealed the hull from erosion. Every now and again artifacts from the ship would be found on the seabed: tantalizing evidence that kept the legend of this great ship in mind.

In 1982, a team finally managed to raise the majority of the ships hull in the full glare of television cameras, following her rediscovery in 1966 and many years of excavation and planning. More than 10,000 artifacts were collected and preserved.

Now began the preservation of the timbers and the items recovered. From the very beginning, the Mary Rose Trust received some £9.5 million from the British National Lottery to get the work done and a makeshift museum was built to house the ship and the exhibits.

In recent years, progress has been made to build a proper Mary Rose museum in Portsmouth, just yards from that other great ship, HMS Victory. The project required £35 million for completion and the British National Lottery funded much of it with a £23 million grant.

The Mary Rose is the only 16th Century ship on display in the world. The new museum, to be opened on 31 May 2013, houses not only the hull but also the now 19,000 artifacts found with the wreck. Exhibits include items in a remarkable state of preservation, ranging from the skeleton of the ship’s dog to leather sandals and books.

With the help of the British National Lottery money, the preservation of the ship’s timbers is in its latter stages. Visitors can still only see the hull through a series of windows but it is hoped these will be removed in four or five years time so the ship can be seen in its entirety.

The Chair of the Heritage Lottery Fund, Dame Jenny Abramsky, said, “It’s incredibly exciting that, after much painstaking conservation work, the Mary Rose is finally ready to go back on show in a wonderful new space where she will undoubtedly wow all who come to visit.”

It is exciting that money from the British National Lottery is being put to such good use.

Find out more about this fascinating project on the Mary Rose website.