The War on the Scammers Email Continues

 
 

Nearly everyone online has received a scammers email at one time or another. Indeed, many of us regularly receive a scammers email encouraging us to send money or provide personal details in exchange for lottery winnings.

Of course, we should never respond to such correspondence as there are never any winnings to be received and the senders of the emails are only after our money or information.

Nonetheless, criminals are making huge amounts of money from these frauds, with a particular problem being criminals from Jamaica targeting vulnerable victims in the USA.
 

Man Relaxing With Laptop On Outside Terrace

 
to snuff out the sources of this heart-breaking crime but, as the rewards are so enormous and the criminal influence so deep-seated, rooting out the perpetrators is taking a great deal of time.

All areas of the US are affected by the scammers email and a recent article in the Kennebec Journal sets out the problems and latest progress from the perspective of the state of Maine. It is estimated that Americans are losing around $300 million a year to these frauds with individuals losing up to $85,000 or more a time. Sadly, as victims are often unwilling to admit their mistake, the total losses could be even greater.

Of course a scammers email or letter can be received by anyone around the world: the Canadian government’s anti-fraud centre, for example, received 2815 complaints in 2012 regarding Jamaican sourced lottery scams.

Please, if you receive such a scammers email, do not reply. You might consider reporting it to your local police but you should then certainly delete it.

Do not become a victim of these heartless criminals.

 

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Lottery Latest News: Beware Lottery Fraud

 
 

Lottery Fraud Message On Smartphone

 
For some time now we at UKLotteryDraw.com have been warning of the large number of scams purporting to be from lottery administrators announcing that the recipient has won a large prize. Scammers email, phone, text or mail to say that the money can be made available if the victim either provides their personal details or sends an amount of money as an ‘administration fee’ (or some other plausible reason).

The KDSK programme, 5 On Your Side, described such scams in the St. Louis, Missouri area on their website, KDSK.com. Scammers are to be found operating from a wide variety of countries, including Canada and Nigeria, but the threat to Americans seems to be largely from Jamaica, for some reason (read our article on the Jamaican fraudsters).

The sad truth is that many innocent people are losing their life savings to these people, who are netting millions of pounds or dollars every year. Police forces in the originating countries are moving in to crack down on this crime but the industry is still booming nonetheless.

The only real way to combat this dreadful crime is to educate potential victims so they do not respond to such approaches.

No matter where the source of the scammers email (or whatever media they use), the rules are always the same:

1. To be in a lottery, you must have first bought a ticket or joined a syndicate. No lottery will operate without participants buying tickets; if you have not paid for your entry, you are not going to win a prize.

2. Lottery administrators NEVER send you any sort of notification of your winning a prize. It is always up to you to claim your prize by approaching them.

3. Never, ever provide personal details or send money to anyone who approaches you unexpectedly. A scammers email or letter can look very official and texts and telephone calls can be very persuasive but do not respond.

Do not even click on links within the email as they can download viruses or other malware to your computer. Equally, do not press any button on your phone if prompted by a telephone caller or message: in such a situation you may well be passed through to a premium rate number, for which you will pay.

4. If any other evidence is needed, a scammers email or letter will use strange language that indicates that English is not the user’s first language. If anything rings alarm bells, go with your gut feeling and back away.

5. The best response is to do nothing at all. Delete the fraudsters email, destroy the letter, put down the telephone, or delete the text. You cannot be caught out if you refuse to play along. Your local police force might be interested however so you might consider taking the letter, copy of the email, the text or details of the telephone call to them.

The old adage ‘if it seems to good to be true, it probably is not true’ is very appropriate.

Please do not encourage these criminals.

To find out more about UK lottery draw scams, visit the National Lottery website. The ActionFraud website is also useful.
 
 

Latest Lottery News: Authorities Cracking Down On Jamaican Lottery Scams


It is quite common for anyone online to receive a scammers email purporting to be from a global international lottery claiming the recipient has won a top prize. Of course, as previously explained on this site, if you have not already joined a lottery, you are not going to win anything. Nonetheless millions of pounds or dollars are being conned out of innocent people every year.

The country of Nigeria has always been considered to be the usual source of a scammers email although Canada has also been discovered as the origin of such scams. In recent years however a new country has started to produce such emails, letters or telephone calls: Jamaica.

Under pressure from the American government, the Jamaican authorities have begun a crackdown on the scammers and their findings are not far short of astonishing.

The Jamaican Observer newspaper reports that those who send a scammers email are racking in millions of dollars every week. They earn so much money that they simply waste it away in ridiculous ways such as washing cars in champagne. Almost anyone can earn in excess of US$120,000 using a mobile phone and a list of leads freely available from large corporations. Such lists provide personal details the victims would be horrified to know are being shared.

The scams grew massively five years ago after a Government crackdown on the drugs trade. One scammer was reported to have earned in excess of $800 million but was murdered in a row over the money. There seems little doubt that the lottery scams finance serious crime.

During the year 2010, it is estimated that scammers raised US$30 million from victims in the state of Minnesota alone. One lady in Florida sent $400,000 to a Jamaican criminal.

As so much money is involved, it should come as no surprise that government officials are implicated. In July two were arrested as part of the investigation – one was the mayor of Montego Bay, where many of the call centres are located. Fortunately this indicates that action is being taken against those who send the scammers email or make illicit telephone calls. Even so, the Jamaican Labour Party has criticised the Government for not doing enough to eradicate the problem.

The Opposition leader, Andrew Holness condemned a rise in killings linked to the crime and the lack of action on the part of the Government in implementing anti-crime legislation.

All this activity in Jamaica just goes to prove that we must all stay vigilant against any scammers email or telephone call. Remember, if it seems too good to be true, it probably is not true.

Please do not fall victim to a scammers email, letter or telephone call